Pattern hacks

Margot Peplum (Love Notions). Lengthening to dress length & a mash up!

The Margot Peplum from Love Notions is a super figure flattering pattern with several options as always. There are two bodice options: a plain one and a princess seamed style that finish slightly above the natural waist, whilst not being an empire line. There are three peplum styles: gathered, box pleated and flared/swing style. For the sleeves: 4 different lengths.

Recommended fabrics: Light to medium weight knit fabrics with at least 25% stretch. Cotton and rayon spandex blends, ITY, scuba and Ponte roma are mentioned as suitable.

There is a standard bust and a full bust option available for both bodice types. The difference between my high bust and full bust is 3″ and the standard bodice is a good match for my body. If it were 4″ or above, the full bust will likely provide more room and a better fit.

According to the above chart available on the product page, I chose a size large with a standard bust. There is 2.5″ of negative ease at the bust and 2″ of negative at the waist on my size, but that differs among the XS-3XL sizing.

My first Margot Peplum dress

The princess seam bodice caught my eye as I’ve always appreciated the improved fit with these design lines and I chose the pleated peplum option with 3/4 length sleeves. For once, I had plenty of the chosen fabric (miracles happen). This made the choice to lengthen the peplum into a dress length easy. At the end of the day, dresses end up being worn more in my lifestyle.

I chose a medium weight printed cotton spandex in blue/orange tones. I measure the stretch to be around 40%.

Fit adjustments:

  • Noting that the bodice style is described to hit 1″ ABOVE the natural waist on a 5ft 5″ woman and that I am 5ft 8″…. there was bound to be a length discrepancy on the bodice. Doing some flat measurements and a quick muslin confirmed I needed to lengthen the bodice by 1″ to achieve the intended look. There aren’t shorten/lengthen lines on the bodice pieces, so I drew line about 1.5″ from the bottom edge of all the pieces. Note: I am using the standard bust and take that line as the bottom reference to draw the lines where I will add length.
  • The gathered peplum piece has a shorten and lengthen line where I cut and spread apart adding 12″ or 25cm to the length while keeping the hem shape and curve. I cleaned out the side seams and kept the grain-line marks continuous here. The total length of this skirt ends up being 22″ and it includes 3/4″ for hem allowance. This is my preferred above-the-knee length for my height.

If you like to “see” practical sewing and pattern adjustments, you can visit my youtube channel and the video all about this project. You can see it on in action and I am sharing a cool neckline binding technique that works amazing for this type of medium weight knit. Have a look below 🙂

After wearing the dress and noticing the constant pulling down of the bodice I was subconsciously doing, I’ve decided I prefer fitted bodices to reach my natural waist. If you note above, the belt rests at my waist and the seam of the bodice can be observed higher as the style is intended. But, for my comfort and preference I will lengthen the bodice at least another 1″ on the next version that was already planned. This will make the bodice 2″ longer for my bodice (Note: I am also taller than the drafted height of the pattern).

I adore the fit of the Margot Peplum bodice, shoulder and sleeves. The dress is so comfortable too. My next one will be different and very stripey!

Second Margot Peplum dress:

I had a stripy dress in mind and chose an athletic type knit composed of Polyamide and spandex. Great stretch and recovery. The stretch is the same horizontally and vertically and this feature makes it prefect for stripe play. I can use the stripes in both direction without compromising the fit of the garment.

I decided to make the bodice sleeveless, lengthen it to reach my waist as discussed prior and cut the princess seams with contrasting stripe directions. I made the side panels have vertical stripes for a flattering look.

In the above photo, you might think I don’t have a waist seam… but I do! I was careful to match the stripes to have them be the same distance throughout the union with the skirt pieces.

This time, I mashed the Margot Peplum bodice to one of the 7 skirt options the Sybil Illusion skirt collection offers.

On the line art above, you can see 7 styles of skirts included in the Sybil Illusion skirt collection and I chose the gored skirt. It’s the first style shown on the bottom row. The seams were easy to match to the seams on the Margot Peplum princess seam bodice and it only took a few tweaks to get them to be a perfect match.

Above you can see that the center pieces for the Margot Peplum (they are meant to be cut on the fold) match the center panels of the Sybil Illusion gored skirt perfectly. The side panels, on the other hand, did require some adaptation. I wanted to keep the original bodice fitted and decided to make the lateral panels of the gored skirt a tiny bit smaller on the sides to match the bodice lateral panels. See below.

The side panels for the gores skirt are the same for the front and the back. I have shown there with the little blue lines, where the side panels of the princess seam bodice reach. I created separate side panels for the skirt. One for the front and one for the back. These are cut twice, mirrored. I tapered the seam from the blue lines to meet the side seams gently.

You can see more details about this stripey dress in the video all about the Sybil Skirts hacks I made for the Love Notions blog in 2019.

I think this pattern can go a long way because of all the options offered. I have yet to try the simple bodice and gathered peplum style. I suspect I will size up to have a less fitted look and would pair it with a lighter weight rayon spandex. Watch this space!

My dress worn in real life 🙂

DISCLAIMER: I was provided the pattern without cost, as a pattern tester, in exchange for sewing a muslin, providing feedback on instructions and fit. I Purchased my own fabric for both versions.

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